Posted by Jennifer Santosuosso on 5/31/2018


118 HIGHLAND ST., Milford, MA 01757

Single-Family

$409,900
Price

10
Rooms
3
Beds
2/1
Full/Half Baths
Just in time for summer! Enjoy barbecuing and entertaining outdoors on this well manicured, expansive backyard that's just shy of 1 acre. With over 2500+ sq. ft. of living space, this home offers two spacious second floor bedrooms with wood flooring and two more rooms on the main level that can be used as an office, playroom, or whatever else suits your needs. Two separate walk up attics provide even more storage space. This property also offers a 1BR in-law apartment with separate entrance, eat-in kitchen, living room, bathroom, private deck, and four season sunroom. Great location with quick access to commuter routes, schools, parks and shopping center. FIRST SHOWINGS BEGIN AT THE OPEN HOUSE ON SUNDAY, JUNE 3 FROM 12-2PM.
Open House
Sunday
June 03 at 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM
Cannot make the Open Houses?
Location: 118 HIGHLAND ST., Milford, MA 01757    Get Directions

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Categories: New Homes  


Posted by Jennifer Santosuosso on 5/31/2018


118 HIGHLAND ST., Milford, MA 01757

Multi-Family

$409,900
Price

2
Units
2,596
Approx. GLA
Spacious side by side two family home offers fantastic investment opportunity, or owner occupy and receive rental income. Just shy of 1 acre, this property features a well manicured, expansive backyard great for entertaining. Unit #1 offers: two spacious second floor bedrooms with wood flooring; 1.5 baths; two main level rooms that can be used as an office, playroom, or whatever else suits your needs; private patio; and two separate walk up attics that provide even more storage space. Unit #2 offers: 1 floor living with 1BR; eat in kitchen; private wood deck; four season sunroom. Washer and dryer hookups are in each unit. Off street parking spaces abound. Great location with quick access to commuter routes, schools, parks and shopping center. FIRST SHOWINGS BEGIN AT THE OPEN HOUSE ON SUNDAY, JUNE 3 FROM 12-2PM.
Open House
Sunday
June 03 at 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM
Cannot make the Open Houses?
Location: 118 HIGHLAND ST., Milford, MA 01757    Get Directions

Similar Properties





Categories: New Homes  


Posted by Jennifer Santosuosso on 5/27/2018

Saving money is never an easy task. And saving money for a down payment on a home is especially difficult. Between trying to pay down debt, whether it is student loan or credit card debt, a car loan, insurance, rent, spending money and trying to save for retirement and your emergency fund, how does that leave any money left to save for a down payment? Let’s take a look at a few smart ways to save for a down payment. First things first: how much you are able to spend? This will determine how much you need to save— 20% of the total home cost. Once you have that figured out you can begin to plan what it will take to save that amount. It should be your goal to save 20% or more, although there are ways around that number. Cut expenses: Cutting expenses is one of the ways to start saving more money. First, take a look at the things that you spend money on each month that you don’t necessarily need. Do you buy groceries and then go out to eat 3 or 4 times week? Cutting down to only going out once a week will save you some big bucks at the end of the year. Can you cut down on any of your utilities such as cable and Internet? What about your rent? Could you get roommates to alleviate the cost of rent or move to a lower cost apartment? Invest: Investing your money, smartly, is the quickest way to increase your money and build your down payment amount. Investing, in general, will not make you crazy amounts of money really quickly (unless you’re one of the lucky few) but it does add up faster than money sitting in your savings account or under your bed. Consider opening up a CD, an IRA account (there are restrictions), or investing in the stock market. It will take a couple of years for this to really build, but the returns will be worth the wait. Be sure to read up on the best option for you and keep an eye on the market if you are planning on investing in an IRA account or stocks. Automate Savings: If you have the funds but just aren’t the best saver then the easiest way to save more money is to automate it, either through your work or bank. Automating your savings will make it seem like that money was never there, therefore making it easier to forget about it and keep it in savings. You’d be surprised how quickly your money can add up. Additional Income: If you really want to speed up reaching your savings goal then you may want to consider adding another source of income. There are so many ways to earn more money such as selling your crafts online, blogging, a second job, etc. Saving all of the money you earn will expedite your savings. There are also other sources of income such as a bonus, or tax return that are not a part of your regular income. These types of income should also be saved towards your down payment to reach your goal sooner. If purchasing a home is of utmost importance to you, but you are lacking the down payment then it is extremely important to make saving a priority. As detailed above, there are many ways in which you can accelerate the process of earning and saving more money.





Posted by Jennifer Santosuosso on 5/20/2018

No homeowner wants to borrow more money. However, if you’re experiencing hard financial times or looking for a way to fund a home improvement project, there are ways to borrow money with your home as collateral.

In this article, we’re going to talk about home equity loans and home equity lines of credit (HELOC). We’ll explain how they differ and break down their benefits and risks.

Before the bubble

Before the financial crisis of 2007-2008, many homeowners were borrowing readily based on the equity of their home. Interest rates were low on home equity loans, encouraging homeowners to leverage their portion of homeownership.

During the recession, however, all of that changed. People owed more money on their mortgages than their homes were worth, and banks became reluctant to lend.

In recent, years, however, house prices have been creeping back up, and banks and homeowners alike have gained confidence in the equity of their home.

As a result, a growing number of homeowners are turning back to home equity loans and lines of credit as a source of low-interest financing.

So, what exactly are these loans and credit lines?

The difference between a home equity loan and a line of credit

A home equity loan is a lump sum of money that you borrow which is secured by the value of your home. Typically, home equity loans are borrowed at a fixed rate. Lenders take into consideration the amount of equity you have in your home, your credit history, and your verifiable income.

A home equity line of credit (HELOC) is a bit different. Like a credit card, you are able to borrow money as you need it via a credit card or checks. HELOCs often have variable interest rates, which means even if you’re approved for an initial low rate it could be increased. As a result, HELOCs are better suited for borrowers who can withstand a higher leverage of risk and variation each month.

Is now a good time to borrow?

If you’re a homeowner, there’s an understandable temptation to use the equity you’ve built over the years to your advantage. In some cases, home equity loans and HELOCs can earn you better interest rates than other forms of borrowing.

However, as with other loan types, it’s important for homeowners to realize that HELOCs and home equity loans are not the same as having cash in your savings account.

Another danger that borrowers face is the potential for foreclosure if things go badly. While most lenders won’t seek foreclosure after a few missed payments, your home has been put up as collateral for repaying the loan. Most lenders will choose to sell a defaulted loan to a collections company rather than seek foreclosure.

Ultimately, the best course of action is to avoid borrowing unless it will help you out financially in the long term. However, for those with high home equity who may, for one reason or another, need to borrow, a home equity loan or line of credit might be the best choice.





Posted by Jennifer Santosuosso on 5/13/2018

After you accept an offer on your house, what happens next? Ultimately, there are several steps that will need to be completed to finalize a home sale, including:

1. Completing a Home Inspection

A home inspection may be completed only a few days after you accept a homebuyer's offer. This evaluation enables a homebuyer to conduct a thorough examination of all aspects of your home, and if necessary, rescind or renegotiate a proposal.

For home sellers, it is paramount to maintain a direct, upfront approach with homebuyers. If you are honest with homebuyers from the get-go, you may be able to avoid problems when it comes time to complete a home inspection.

With an experienced real estate agent at your disposal, you should have no trouble establishing realistic expectations for your home. Plus, your real estate agent will offer recommendations for home repairs and upgrades, ensuring that you can complete the necessary home improvement tasks before you add your residence to the real estate market.

2. Performing Home Repairs and Upgrades

If a homebuyer discovers major problems with your house during a home inspection, he or she may request home repairs or upgrades. In this scenario, you may be required to perform various home improvement tasks to finalize an agreement.

Home improvement tasks can be expensive and time-consuming, but they sometimes are necessary to ensure that you can reach the finish line of the home selling process. If you ever have concerns or questions about home repairs and upgrades, your real estate agent should be able to respond to your queries at any time.

Furthermore, if you feel like a homebuyer's home repair and upgrade requests are unwarranted, you can always decline these requests. If you choose this option, however, the homebuyer could rescind his or her offer on your home, and you may need to restart the home selling process from stage one.

On the other hand, you can always try to negotiate with a homebuyer. For example, if you offer to lower the price of your house after an inspection, you may be able to speed up the home selling cycle and avoid making a significant time investment to perform property repairs and upgrades.

3. Packing Up Your Belongings

After a homebuyer finishes an inspection and agrees to purchase your home in its current condition, you'll be able to set up a closing date. You'll also need to consider where you'll go next and plan accordingly.

Packing up your belongings is essential, and you may want to put various items in storage if you plan to live in temporary housing in the foreseeable future. In addition, you'll want to set up plans to get all of your belongings out of your residence before the closing date to ensure that the homebuyer can move into the house on schedule.

Selling a home may seem tricky, especially for those who are uncertain about how to navigate the home selling process. Luckily, your real estate agent is happy to support you in any way possible. As a result, you can work with your real estate agent and guarantee that the home selling process is completed quickly and effortlessly.




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